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     MANUSCRIPTS and ARCHIVAL MATERIAL

Wade Hampton Frost papers

 Collection
Identifier: MS-2

  • Staff Only

Dates

  • 1880-1938; 1938-1984

Language of Materials

English

Conditions Governing Access

No restrictions

Biographical / Historical Information

A 1903 medical alumnus of the University of Virginia, Wade Hampton Frost (1880-1938) was a surgeon with the United States Public Health Service from 1905 to 1929. In 1919, he was assigned as resident lecturer to the new Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. In 1929, he resigned from the United States Public Health Service in order to serve full-time as professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University. From 1931 to 1934, he was Dean of Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.
Wade Hampton Frost was a pioneer in the study of water pollution. He also conducted important research on poliomyelitis, yellow fever, influenza, diptheria, and tuberculosis. Throughout his professional life, Frost emphasized development of the epidemiological method in the investigation of disease. His work helped transform epidemiology from a descriptive to an analytic science and contributed to the establishment of epidemiology as a distinct field of medical research.

Extent

6.25 Linear Feet

Physical Description

7.5 linear ft. (17 boxes, ca. 600 items); personal papers and publications: 15 boxes, 13 cm x 39.5 cm x 26.5 cm; framed photographs, scrapbook, and audiotapes: 1 box, 32.5 cm x 41 cm x 26.5 cm; artifacts : 1 box, 11 x 18 x 9.5 inches
Title
A Guide to the Wade Hampton Frost papers, 1880-1984
Subtitle
MS-2
Author
Claude Moore Health Sciences Library
Date
2003
Language of description
Undetermined
Script of description
Code for undetermined script
Language of description note
English

Repository Details

Part of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library Repository

Contact:
Claude Moore Health Sciences Library
1300 Jefferson Park Avenue
P.O. Box 800722
Charlottesville Virginia 22908-0722 United States
(434) 982-0576